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More asylum seekers brought to Dover amid heatwave after record day for small boat crossings yesterday

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Boat loads of suspected asylum seekers continue to be brought into Kent following a record day for landings on Monday.

As temperatures reached 26 degrees today, men women and children were filmed by our reporter being brought ashore at Dover Marina.

It came as a record breaking 430 people completed the perilous journey from France to the UK yesterday with some landing at Kent beaches including Kingsdown near Deal and Romney Marsh.

The staggering influx was from a total of 14 crossings undertaken in scorching heat.

Some were pictured looking fatigued lying on the ground away from the shingle at North Road in Kingsdown.

Today, our reporter was on scene at Dover Marina and filmed a border force cutter arriving at Dover Marina at about 1pm.

He said: “The back and front open areas are full of people in red life jackets, presumed to be asylum seekers.”

Scores of suspected asylum seekers are brought ashore on a Border Force patrol vessel on Tuesday. Pictures Sam Lennon KM Group
Scores of suspected asylum seekers are brought ashore on a Border Force patrol vessel on Tuesday. Pictures Sam Lennon KM Group

They remained on the boat allowing a Border Force dinghy to enter the Marina carrying a small group of people.

That was unloaded before another vessel came in towing small dinghies. The actual number of landings today has not been released.

Yesterday in Dungeness, around 50 people were seen landing on a beach after crossing the sea in a single dinghy.

Some raised their hands in celebration as they stood on the beach, while others sat down on the shingle shoreline amid 24C sunshine.

The vessel had been watched by the RNLI as it got closer and closer to the coast before eventually landing on the beach at around 1pm.

An empty dinghy is towed into Dover Marina following the arrival of a large group of people on the Border Force patrol boat behind. Pictures Sam Lennon KM Group
An empty dinghy is towed into Dover Marina following the arrival of a large group of people on the Border Force patrol boat behind. Pictures Sam Lennon KM Group

Among the arrivals were women and children, some too young to walk, and some people had to be supported as they walked on to the beach.

The figure from yesterday passes the previous daily high of 416 set in September 2020, according to data compiled by the PA news agency.

High numbers of crossings have continued this summer despite Home Secretary Priti Patel’s vow to make the English Channel crossings “unviable”.

In Parliament yesterday, Theresa May sounded warnings over the prospect of the UK sending asylum seekers to Australia-style offshore processing centres.

The former prime minister said she considered the idea when home secretary but rejected the option due to “practical concerns”.

A Border Force search and rescue boat brings a small group of people ashore. Picture Sam Lennon KM GROUP
A Border Force search and rescue boat brings a small group of people ashore. Picture Sam Lennon KM GROUP

Her remarks came as MPs considered the Nationality and Borders Bill, which includes clauses to allow the UK to be able to send asylum seekers to a “safe third country” and to submit claims at a “designated place” determined by the Secretary of State.

Bella Sankey, director of charity Detention Action, said: “The Home Office’s anti-refugee Bill is political theatre that doesn’t even pretend to deal with the issue or make our system, safe, fair or efficient.

“We need a mechanism allowing refugees arriving at the UK border in France to be given safe passage, and until we have it, all else is noise and distraction.”

At the time we wet to press figures for the number of landings on Tuesday were not available.

Read more: All the latest news from Kent

Read more: All the latest news from Dover

Read more: All the latest news from Deal

Deal Dover Romney Marsh Beth Robson



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